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Herbal iced teas are a great way to help cool down after a hot summer’s day! Most summer mornings, I brew a pot of herbal tea and pop it into the fridge so that we can enjoy it during the heat of the day. I also blend my herbal iced teas with fruit and freeze them in popsicle molds to make powered-up popsicles. 

Hibiscus-Lemongrass-Mint

Hibiscus flowers make a beautiful, sour, red tea that is beloved in hot climates around the world. In this recipe, I combine them with cooling spearmint and mild lemongrass to make a tea that tastes as good as it looks.

  • 2 parts hibiscus flowers
  • 1 part lemongrass
  • 1 part spearmint

Use 1-2 tsp of herbs per 8 oz cup of tea. Steep herbs in just boiled water for 4-5 minutes. Stir in desired sweetener while the tea is still warm. Refrigerate until cool and serve over ice.  

This tea blends beautifully with frozen strawberries or raspberries for a smoothie or popsicle. 

Lemon Balm & Rose Petal

Lemon balm makes a delicious lemony iced tea on its own or can be combined with rose petals for a lovely floral twist. Lemon balm and rose petals are especially good for taking the heat out of the skin making this a great tea to drink while recovering from a sunburn

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  • 2 parts lemon balm 
  • 1 part rose petals

Use 1-2 tsp of herbs per 8 oz cup of tea. Steep herbs in just boiled water for 2-3 minutes. Stir in desired sweetener while the tea is still warm. Refrigerate until cool and serve over ice.

This tea blends beautifully with frozen melon or grapes for a smoothie or popsicle. 

Chrysanthemum Tea

Chrysanthemum flower tea is consumed all over the world and loved for its cooling and calming effects. I first learned about chrysanthemum tea in naturopathic medical school. Students loved it because it helped them stay cool in the summer and offset the overheating that resulted from drinking too much coffee. There’s evidence that chrysanthemum tea might also be a great hangover remedy. You can find chrysanthemum tea already prepared in bottles, cans, and juice boxes in many grocery stores. While these are handy, they usually contain more sugar than is necessary. My kids love the mild taste of chrysanthemum tea which is a little reminiscent of chamomile. To make your own, brew 1-2 teaspoons of chrysanthemum flowers in just boiled water for 3-4 minutes.

This tea blends beautifully with honey and frozen cherries for a smoothie or popsicle.

 

References:

Wang, F., Zhang, Y. J., Zhou, Y., Li, Y., Zhou, T., Zheng, J., Zhang, J. J., Li, S., Xu, D. P., & Li, H. B. (2016). Effects of Beverages on Alcohol Metabolism: Potential Health Benefits and Harmful Impacts. International journal of molecular sciences, 17(3), 354. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms17030354 

 

Dr. Green Mom

Dr. Mayer is a naturopathic medical doctor and an expert in nutrition and wellness as it relates to pediatrics and families. Her passion for prevention of disease as cure fueled her desire to immerse herself into specializing in adult onset chronic conditions, as well as childhood chronic illness.

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